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Finding a way through loss

10 Jun

My parents at their 50th anniversary in 2015

by Patrick Novecosky

When my parents married in 1965, they had two significant goals: to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary together and to raise a large family. They succeeded on both counts – nine children and 16 grandchildren. Then in October 2015, they celebrated a half century of wedded bliss with a church service and a gathering of friends and family.

A couple months later, my dad woke up with a backache. He thought it was nothing, but it didn’t go away. He had it checked out after a few weeks. Doctors suspected cancer, which was confirmed in the spring. He died in July 2016.

Their 50th anniversary in October 2015 was a memorable event

When I was growing up, I rarely pondered what life would be like without my parents. Although my father passed away, my mother is still spry at 71 years old. But I realize that the day will come when I’ll dial the phone number I’ve known all my life and she won’t be there to answer. That thought doesn’t frighten me. It makes me appreciate the half century of life I’ve had with them.

One thing is certain: life is a journey, not a destination. And it’s the bumps along the road of life and the people we meet along the way that make it worth living. Happily for me, my parents set the template for how to travel that road. They loved passionately and they lived passionately. They set priorities of faith, family and work – without missing the opportunity to celebrate successes and victories big and small.

Mark Twain famously wrote that “20 years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the things you did. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

My parents with their nine children

That’s the philosophy I’ve tried to live by. Early in life, my father encouraged me with similar advice. He wanted me to do what I love and love what I do for a career. Dad also taught me that turning down opportunities to gain wisdom and experience comes at a cost, and that cost is regret. I’ve been blessed to visit 26 countries. Only 170 more to go! And if I get the chance to visit number 27, I’ll go. Each stop along the way has taught me something and enriched my life experience.

Dealing with Dad’s cancer and death was hard on the entire family, but he raised me to be a man of faith – and he modeled it for me and my siblings. He had wonderful hospice care at home – a visiting nurse who gave extraordinary care to him and advice to my mother. But there came a point where Mom was no longer able to take of his daily needs.

During Dad’s last few weeks of life spent in the hospital, he never lost his sense of humor. When a nurse came to his room announcing, ™Time to take your vitals,” he quipped right back: “Well, you might as well take them. Nobody else wants them!” Mark Twain would have been proud.

PATRICK NOVECOSKY is the editor of this blog and the president of NovaMedia. This article appeared in the Summer 2017 issue of Good Grief, a publication of Partners in Care Alliance.

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Pope Benedict XVI@90

16 Apr

The Pope Emeritus continues to leave a remarkable legacy

By Patrick Novecosky

When Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI turns 90 years old today, it will likely be with little public fanfare — after all, it’s Easter Sunday! But for those of us who appreciate his legacy and massive contributions to the Body of Christ, we will mark the day with joy — and a toast to the man who now likes to be called “Father Benedict.”

President Bush and first lady Laura Bush lead the celebration of Pope Benedict XVI’s 81st birthday as he’s presented a cake by White House pastry chef Bill Yosses on April 16, 2008, at the White House in Washington.

The retired pope, who rarely makes public appearances, may participate in the Easter Sunday Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, my sources tell me. No public celebrations are planned, but you can be sure that his inner circle of friends will shower him with well-wishes.

I was among the hundreds of media surrounding Benedict’s visit to Washington and New York nine years ago. I was at Andrews Air Force Base when the Holy Father set foot on U.S. soil for the first time as pope. Many Legatus members were on the White House lawn for the remarkable celebration of his 81st birthday. Who can forget the massive cake that President Bush had prepared for him?

Benedict’s birthday this year will mark yet another milestone. He will become only the second pope to live into his nineties. Pope Leo XIII, elected in 1878, lived to the ripe old age of 93 years, 140 days. He reigned on the Chair of Peter for 25 years, 150 days.

Legacy and impact

Although Benedict has been mostly silent since his resignation four years ago, his legacy and impact on the Church are still felt — and will no doubt be felt for many decades to follow. Markedly different in style and personality from his successor, Benedict’s depth and intellect were evident in his teaching.

CruxNow.com reports that due to age and limited vision, Benedict no longer writes, but with the consent of his successor, last year three lengthy interviews were published.

Pope Benedict XVI and President George W. Bush cross the tarmac at Andrews Air Force Base on April 15, 2008, on the Holy Father’s first visit to the United States (Patrick Novecosky photo)

One was a 2015 conversation with Jesuit theologian Jacques Servais, on the doctrine of justification and faith. Then there was the interview with his Italian biographer, Elio Gueriero, published in the book Servant of God and Humanity: The Biography of Benedict XVI, prefaced by Pope Francis.

Last but not least, there was the book-length interview, Last Testament: In His Own Words, with German journalist Peter Seewald, with whom the pontiff had already done two similar projects. The book represented the first time in history that a pope described his own pontificate after it ended.

Listing Benedict’s contributions to the Church likewise would need book-length treatment. Instead, here are 10 pithy and potent quotes from the remarkable heart and mind of Joseph Ratzinger (hat tip to my friend Elizabeth Scalia at Aleteia.com):

1. “Evil draws its power from indecision and concern for what other people think.” 1st Station, Meditations for Stations of the Cross, Good Friday, 2005

2. “Holiness does not consist in never having erred or sinned. Holiness increases the capacity for conversion, for repentance, for willingness to start again and, especially, for reconciliation and forgiveness.” Audience, 31 January 2007

3. “Freedom of conscience is the core of all freedom.” Church, Ecumenism and Politics (2008)

4. “One who has hope lives differently.” Spe Salvi, 2 (2007)

5. “Seeing with the eyes of Christ, I can give to others much more than their outward necessities; I can give them the look of love which they crave.” Deus Caritas Est, 18 (2005)

6. “God’s love for his people is so great that it turns God against himself, his love against his justice.” Deus Caritas Est, 10 (2005)

7. “The ways of the Lord are not easy, but we were not created for an easy life but for great things, for goodness.” Speaking to German pilgrims, 25 April 2005

8. “It is true: God disturbs our comfortable day-today existence. Jesus’ kingship goes hand in hand with his passion.” Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives (2012)

9. “The proper request of love is that our entire life should be oriented to the imitation of the Beloved. Let us therefore spare no effort to leave a transparent trace of God’s love in our life.” The Church Fathers: From Clement of Rome to Augustine (2008)

10. “Violence does not build up the kingdom of God, the kingdom of humanity. On the contrary, it is a favorite instrument of the Antichrist, however idealistic its religious motivation may be. It serves not humanity, but inhumanity.” Jesus of Nazareth, Part Two: Holy Week: From the Entrance Into Jerusalem to the Resurrection (2011)

PATRICK NOVECOSKY is the editor of this blog. This article appeared in the April issue of Legatus magazine.

The Case for Christ is a compelling love story

10 Apr

Starring Mike Vogel, Erika Christensen, Faye Dunaway
Run time: 112 minutes
Rated: PG
In theaters April 7

After reading Lee Strobel’s book The Case for Christ a few years ago, I attempted to contact him by email. In his book, the former investigative journalist recounts his journey from atheism to Christianity. He set out to prove that Jesus was a hoax and the resurrection never happened.

In my email, I challenged Strobel to write a sequel: The Case for Catholicism. I asked him to apply the same passion and take the same approach — turning over every rock, probing every historical crevice to prove that the Catholic Church is not the church founded by Jesus Christ. I’m not sure if my email got through. I didn’t receive a response.

Mike Vogel stars as Lee Strobel in The Case for Christ

Strobel’s best-selling book is now a full-length motion picture — a very important one at that. The film — produced by Pure Flix, the studio behind God’s Not Dead (and its sequel) and Woodlawn — cracked the Top 10 last weekend. It should be a massive hit, entering the box office race right before Easter.

The story is compelling, well-acted and better written than most Christian (or even mainstream) films these days. In the movie, Strobel (Mike Vogel, The Help, Cloverfield) is frustrated that his wife Leslie (Erika Christensen, Parenthood, Flightplan) finds Christ and gets baptized. He sees Jesus as his rival and sets out to prove that Christianity is a sham. In the process, Strobel uncovers massive amounts of evidence, but none of it backs up his own worldview. He discovers that it takes more faith to disbelieve in Jesus than to embrace the historic truths that back up everything about the Lord, his death and resurrection.

“In the end, The Case for Christ is a love story.” ~Patrick Novecosky.

In the end, The Case for Christ is a love story — Strobel’s love for his wife, his wife’s love for him and Jesus, and, ultimately, Jesus’ love for each and every one of us. In our age of rapid secularization and indifference to facts and the truth, The Case for Christ is one of the most important films of the past decade. Strobel’s book is powerful and compelling. The film version captures it perfectly. Let’s just pray he takes up my challenge. It would be a riveting sequel!

PATRICK NOVECOSKY is the editor of this blog. His review appeared in the April issue of Legatus magazine.

 

EWTN Radio: Legatus’ 30th anniversary

8 Mar

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 8, 2017) — Legatus magazine’s editor-in-chief Patrick Novecosky, editor of this blog, was an in-studio guest on EWTN Radio’s Morning Glory program this morning.

MorningGloryAlso in-studio were Morning Glory host Brian PatrickDr. Matthew Bunson, Amy McInerny of Human Life Action, producer Alyssa Murphy,  and Dominican Fr. Thomas Petri.

During the 10-minute segment, the hosts asked Novecosky about Legatus’ 30-year history, the ethical challenges facing presidents and CEOs, and Legatus’ formation of Catholic business leaders. Both Bunson and McInerny both talked about their own experiences speaking to Legatus chapters across the country.

CLICK HERE to listen to the entire interview (10 minutes 28 seconds)

At EWTN’s Washington, DC, studios (L-R) Dr. Matthew Bunson (EWTN Senior Contributor), Catherine Szeltner (Host, EWTN Pro-Life Weekly), Patrick Novecosky (Editor-in-Chief, Legatus magazine)

Catholic Answers: Faith, work and the New Evangelization

24 Feb
Patrick Novecosky takes a turn behind the host's mic in the Catholic Answers studio

Patrick Novecosky takes a turn behind the host’s mic in the Catholic Answers studio

EL CAJON, California (Feb. 24, 2017) – Legatus magazine editor-in-chief Patrick Novecosky was an in-studio guest on Catholic Answers Focus this afternoon, broadcast across the United States on various Catholic radio networks, including Immaculate Heart Radio.

Catholic Answers host Cy Kellett asked Novecosky about Legatus’ efforts to form Catholic business executives in the faith. Legatus is a membership organization of Catholic business leaders. Kellett also asked Novecosky about the evolution of Catholic media over the past 25 years, the influence of Opus Dei, and the importance of allowing one’s faith to shine through at work.

Kellett also asked Novecosky about his public speaking on topics like fatherhood, Divine Mercy, and Pope St. John Paul II. Novecosky worked for the National Shrine of The Divine Mercy for five years, and he met the saint four times. CLICK HERE to listen to the entire interview (31 minutes).

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Jennifer Fulwiler Show: Can you bring your faith to work?

7 Feb

the-catholic-channel-logoNEW YORK (Feb. 7, 2017)–Legatus magazine editor-in-chief Patrick Novecosky was a guest on The Jennifer Fulwiler Show this afternoon on Sirius XM’s The Catholic Channel. Fulwiler asked Novecosky about the challenges about sharing one’s faith in the workplace. In a post-Christian culture, there is a debate about the best way to live between those who have a daily walk with Christ and those who live a secular life, he said.

They discussed how business owners and other leaders can live their faith at work — and also how regular workers can be more overt about their faith at the office. Novecosky talked about praying for those we work with and waiting for an opportunity to share our faith as St. Peter wrote: “Always be ready to give a reason for our hope.” CLICK HERE to listen to the entire interview (17 minutes).

Walking the walk: Finding faith and friendship at work

18 Jan

morningshow31-trans800FORT WAYNE, Indiana (January 17, 2017) — Legatus magazine editor-in-chief Patrick Novecosky was a guest on The Kyle Heimann Show this morning on Redeemer Radio. Host Kyle Heimann asked Novecosky about how to find friends who can support us in our work and in our faith.

Novecosky relayed some good advice from St. John Bosco about finding friends who will help us grow in holiness and virtue. He stressed the importance of daily prayer and listening to the Lord to discern his will for our lives. They also talked about how to find faith-filled friends at work by listening and by being forthright about our faith in all aspects of our lives. CLICK HERE to listen to the entire interview (First 14 minutes).